Sonofabitch stew

Son-of-a-bitch stew

Type
Stew

Place of origin
United States

Region or state
Western United States

Main ingredients
Beef, offal, marrow gut

Cookbook: Son-of-a-bitch stew  Media: Son-of-a-bitch stew

Sonofabitch stew (or son-of-a-bitch stew) was a cowboy dish of the American West.

Contents

1 Recipes
2 Alternative Names
3 See also
4 References
5 Notes

Recipes[edit]
A beef stew, various recipes exist, and some sources say its ingredients may vary according to whatever is on hand. Most recipes involve meat and offal from a calf, though, making sonofabitch stew something of a luxury item on the trail. Alan Davidson’s Oxford Companion to Food specifies meats and organs from a freshly killed unweaned calf, including the brain, heart, liver, sweetbreads, tongue, pieces of tenderloin, and an item called the “marrow gut” and lots of Louisiana hot sauce.
This last item, the “marrow gut”, was a key ingredient. Davidson quotes Ramon Adam’s 1952 Come An’ Get It: The Story of the Old Cowboy Cook, which reports that this is a tube, between two of the calf’s stomachs, filled with a substance resembling marrow, deemed edible only while the calf is young and still feeding on milk. This marrow-like substance was included in the stew and, according to Adams, was “what gave the stew such a delicious flavor”. Davidson says this “marrow gut” probably was the passage leading to the abomasum as well as the abomasum itself (said to have a “distinctive flavour of rennin-curdled milk”).
The stew also contained seasonings and sometimes onion.
Frank X. Tolbert’s 1962 history of chili con carne, A Bowl of Red, discusses sonofabitch stew as well.[1] Tolbert suggests that the chuck wagon cooks borrowed the idea for the stew from the cooking of the Plains Indians. He also specifies a recipe that never includes onions, tomatoes, or potatoes.
Alternative Names[edit]
In addition to “sonofabitch stew”, the dish was known as “rascal stew”, “SOB stew”, or fitted with the name of any unpopular figure at the time: for example, “Cleveland stew” in honor of Grover Cleveland, a president in disfavor with the cowboys displaced from the Cherokee Strip. “In the presence of ladies”, reports a 1942 Gourmet magazine piece, the dish was commonly called “son-of-a-gun stew” instead.[2] The “polite” name is used in the Gunsmoke episode “Long, Long Trail” (7.6).
See also[edit]

List of stews

References[edit]

Davidson, Alan (1999). “Sonofabitch Stew”. The Oxford Companion to Food. Oxfor

Märta Adlerz

Märta Elvira Adlerz (later Hermansson, April 3, 1897 – February 28, 1979) was a Swedish diver who competed in the 1912 Summer Olympics and in the 1920 Summer Olympics.
She was born in Stockholm and died in Bromma.
In 1912 she was eliminated in the first round of the 10 metre platform competition.
Eight years later she was again eliminated in the first round of the 10 metre platform event.
She was the younger sister of Erik Adlerz, who was also an olympic swimmer.
External links[edit]

profile

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Groapa River (Barcău)

Groapa River

River

Countries
Romania

Counties
Sălaj County

Mouth
Barcău

 - location
Zăuan

 - coordinates
47°13′17″N 22°38′19″E / 47.2215°N 22.6385°E / 47.2215; 22.6385Coordinates: 47°13′17″N 22°38′19″E / 47.2215°N 22.6385°E / 47.2215; 22.6385

Progression
Barcău→ Crișul Repede→ Körös→ Tisza→ Danube→ Black Sea

The Groapa River is a left tributary of the river Barcău in Romania. It discharges into the Barcău in Zăuan.
References[edit]

Administrația Națională Apelor Române – Cadastrul Apelor – București
Institutul de Meteorologie și Hidrologie – Rîurile României – București 1971

Maps[edit]

Județul Sălaj – Harta interactiva [1]

This article related to a river in Sălaj County is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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일산오피

List of Marathi films of 2002

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A list of films produced by the Marathi language film industry based in Maharashtra in the year 2002.
2002 Releases[edit]
A list of Marathi films released in 2002.

Year
Film
Director
Cast
Release Date
Producer
Notes
Source

2002

Vaastupurush
Sumitra Bhave, Sunil Sukthankar
Sadashiv Amrapurkar, Uttara Baokar, Siddharth Daftardar

National Film Development Corporation of India
National Film Award for Best Feature Film in Marathi in 2002
[1]

Dahavi Fa
Sumitra Bhave, Sunil Sukthankar
Atul Kulkarni, Jyoti Subhash, Milind Gunaji
17 February 2002
Sunil Sukthankar

[2]

Bhet
Chandrakant Kulkarni
Atul Kulkarni, Tushar Dalvi, Vijay Divan, Manjusha Godse
31 May 2002 (India)
Everest Entertainment

[3]

Owalini
Dr. Babasaheb Powar
Chetan Dalvi, Alka Inamdar, Alka Kubal
26 April 2002 (India)
Everest Entertainment

[4]

References[edit]

^ yogesh-kalyankar (29 August 2015). “Vaastupurush (2002) – IMDb”. IMDb. 
^ “Dahavi pha (2002)”. IMDb. 29 August 2015. 
^ “Bhet (2002)”. IMDb. 31 May 2002. 
^ “Owalini (2002)”. IMDb. 26 April 2002. 

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Sharad Singh Bhandari

Sharad Singh Bhandari is a Nepalese politician, belonging to the Madhesi Jana Adhikar Forum, Nepal. In the 2008 Constituent Assembly election he was elected from the Achham-2 constituency, winning 17976 votes.[1]
References[edit]

^ Election Commission of Nepal

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Hate to Love You

Hate to Love You

English cover of Hate to Love You

キライ嫌いも
(Kirai Kiraimo)

Genre
Yaoi

Manga

Written by
Makoto Tateno

Published by
Ohzora Publishing

English publisher

NA
Aurora Publishing

Published
September 2001

Anime and Manga portal

Hate to Love You (Japanese: キライ嫌いも, Hepburn: Kirai Kiraimo?) is a yaoi manga by Makoto Tateno and published by Ohzora Publishing. It has been published in English by Aurora Publishing and in German by Egmont Manga & Anime.[1][2]
Reception[edit]
Adrienne Hess found both male characters in Hate to Love You stereotypical, but enjoyed the portrayal of Akiko, a “female love interest” of Yuma, as the couple’s “cupid”. She found the second story to be “slightly disturbing”. Hess praised the artwork, especially the expressive faces.[3] Katja Bürk, writing for animePRO, describes the manga as “Strong feelings can change and so there can easily be love from hate, or vice versa.”[4] Brigid Alverson feels that there is little similarity to Romeo and Juliet despite the feud between the families, and found Akiko, who unites the two families to be the “most likable” character. Alverson found the other story in the volume “rather creepy”. Alverson found Tateno’s art ‘rather flat’ yet ‘dynamic’ in places.[5]
References[edit]

^ “Hate to Love You”. Aurora Publishing. Retrieved 17 December 2009. 
^ “Hate to love you, one-shot” (in German). Egmont Manga. Retrieved 17 December 2009. 
^ Hess, Adrianne (April 30, 2008). “Hate to Love You Vol. #01”. Mania.com. Retrieved January 10, 2008. 
^ Bürk, Katja (7 September 2008). “Hate to love you (Manga)” (in German). AnimePRO. Retrieved 17 December 2009. 
^ Alverson, Brigid (3 March 2008). “Review: Two from Deux”. Retrieved 17 December 2009. 

External links[edit]

Hate to Love You (manga) at Anime News Network’s encyclopedia

This manga-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Russell Lee (photographer)

Russell Lee

Russell Lee

Born
(1903-07-21)July 21, 1903
Ottawa, Illinois, U.S.A.

Died
August 28, 1986(1986-08-28) (aged 83)
Austin, Texas, U.S.A.

Russell Lee (July 21, 1903, Ottawa, Illinois – August 28, 1986, Austin, Texas) was an American photographer and photojournalist, best known for his work for the Farm Security Administration (FSA). His technically excellent images documented the ethnography of various American classes and cultures.

Contents

1 Life
2 Legacy
3 Selected photographs
4 References
5 External links

Life[edit]
The son of Burton Lee and wife Adeline Werner, Lee grew up in Ottawa, Illinois and went to the Culver Military Academy in Culver, Indiana for high school. He earned a degree in chemical engineering from Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.[1]
He gave up an excellent position as a chemist to become a painter. Originally he used photography as a precursor to his painting, but soon became interested in photography for its own sake, recording the people and places around him. Among his earliest subjects were Pennsylvanian bootleg mining and the Father Divine cult.[2]
In the fall of 1936, during the Great Depression, Lee was hired for the federally sponsored Farm Security Administration (FSA) photographic documentation project of the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration. He joined a team assembled under Roy Stryker, along with Dorothea Lange, Arthur Rothstein and Walker Evans. Stryker provided direction and bureaucratic protection to the group, leaving the photographers free to compile what in 1973 was described as “the greatest documentary collection which has ever been assembled.”[3] Lee created some of the iconic images produced by the FSA, including photographic studies of San Augustine, Texas in 1939, and Pie Town, New Mexico in 1940. Over the spring and summer of 1942, Lee was one of several government photographers to document the eviction of Japanese Americans from the West Coast, producing over 600 images of families waiting to be removed and their later life in various detention facilities.[4]
After the FSA was defunded in 1943, Lee served in the Air Transport Command (ATC), during which he took photographs of all the airfield approaches used by the ATC to supply the Armed Forces in World War II. He worked for the United States Department of the Interior (DOI) in 1946 and 1947, helping the agency compile a medical survey in the communities involved in mining bituminous coal. He created over 4,

‘t Hooft–Polyakov monopole

In theoretical physics, the ‘t Hooft–Polyakov monopole is a topological soliton similar to the Dirac monopole but without any singularities. It arises in the case of a Yang–Mills theory with a gauge group G, coupled to a Higgs field which spontaneously breaks it down to a smaller group H via the Higgs mechanism. It was first found independently by Gerard ‘t Hooft and Alexander Polyakov.[1][2]
Unlike the Dirac monopole, the ‘t Hooft–Polyakov monopole is a smooth solution with a finite total energy. The solution is localized around

r
=
0

{\displaystyle r=0}

. Very far from the origin, the gauge group G is broken to H, and the ‘t Hooft–Polyakov monopole reduces to the Dirac monopole.
However, at the origin itself, the G gauge symmetry is unbroken and the solution is non-singular also near the origin. The Higgs field

H

i

(
i
=
1
,
2
,
3
)

{\displaystyle H_{i}\qquad (i=1,2,3)\,}

is proportional to

x

i

f
(

|

x

|

)

{\displaystyle x_{i}f(|x|)\,}

where the adjoint indices are identified with the three-dimensional spatial indices. The gauge field at infinity is such that the Higgs field’s dependence on the angular directions is pure gauge. The precise configuration for the Higgs field and the gauge field near the origin is such that it satisfies the full Yang–Mills–Higgs equations of motion.
Mathematical details[edit]
Suppose the vacuum is the vacuum manifold Σ. Then, for finite energies, as we move along each direction towards spatial infinity, the state along the path approaches a point on the vacuum manifold Σ. Otherwise, we would not have a finite energy. In topologically trivial 3 + 1 dimensions, this means spatial infinity is homotopically equivalent to the topological sphere S2. So, the superselection sectors are classified by the second homotopy group of Σ, π2(Σ).
In the special case of a Yang–Mills–Higgs theory, the vacuum manifold is isomorphic to the quotient space G/H and the relevant homotopy group is π2(G/H). Note that this doesn’t actually require the existence of a scalar Higgs fie

Painless Love

Painless Love

Directed by
Charley Chase

Produced by
Abe Stern
Julius Stern

Starring
Oliver Hardy

Production
company

L-KO Kompany

Distributed by
Universal Film Manufacturing Company

Release date

October 23, 1918 (1918-10-23)

Running time

2 reels

Country
United States

Language
Silent (English intertitles)

Painless Love is a 1918 American silent comedy film featuring Oliver Hardy.

Contents

1 Cast
2 Reception
3 See also
4 References
5 External links

Cast[edit]

Oliver Hardy as Dr. Hurts (credited as Babe Hardy)
Billy Armstrong as His assistant
Charles Inslee as The building owner
Peggy Prevost as Swimming pool manager

Reception[edit]
Like many American films of the time, Painless Love was subject to restrictions and cuts by city and state film censorship boards. For example, the Chicago Board of Censors required a cut, in Reel 1, of two scenes of young woman in one piece bathing suit playing hide-and-seek with the man, near view of young women at pool, two near views of young woman in bathing suit with apron, Reel 2, first two and last two scenes of young women in one piece bathing suits, two closeups of young woman with low cut gown at table, scene of man throwing coin in trouser front and following vulgar actions, two near views of couple in suggestive dance, and three scenes of “Madam Bevo” in suggestive dance where he wriggles tail of hula costume.[1]
See also[edit]

List of American films of 1918
Oliver Hardy filmography

References[edit]

^ “Official Cut-Outs by the Chicago Board of Censors”. Exhibitors Herald. New York City: Exhibitors Herald Company. 7 (26): 42. December 21, 1918. 

External links[edit]

Painless Love at the Internet Movie Database

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Brandon Broady

This biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (December 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Brandon A. Broady

Birth name
Brandon Broady

Medium
comedy, film, radio personality, television personality

Nationality
American

Years active
2010 —

Notable works and roles
BET’s the Xperiment

Brandon A. Broady is an American comedian, actor and television host best known for hosting BET’s The Xperiment.[1]
Early life[edit]
Broady grew up in Silver Spring, Maryland and attended Springbrook High School and Towson University.
References[edit]

^ Bartel (February 25, 2015). “Towson University grad Brandon Broady hosting new BET series”. The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 

This article about an American actor or actress is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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