‘t Hooft–Polyakov monopole

In theoretical physics, the ‘t Hooft–Polyakov monopole is a topological soliton similar to the Dirac monopole but without any singularities. It arises in the case of a Yang–Mills theory with a gauge group G, coupled to a Higgs field which spontaneously breaks it down to a smaller group H via the Higgs mechanism. It was first found independently by Gerard ‘t Hooft and Alexander Polyakov.[1][2]
Unlike the Dirac monopole, the ‘t Hooft–Polyakov monopole is a smooth solution with a finite total energy. The solution is localized around

r
=
0

{\displaystyle r=0}

. Very far from the origin, the gauge group G is broken to H, and the ‘t Hooft–Polyakov monopole reduces to the Dirac monopole.
However, at the origin itself, the G gauge symmetry is unbroken and the solution is non-singular also near the origin. The Higgs field

H

i

(
i
=
1
,
2
,
3
)

{\displaystyle H_{i}\qquad (i=1,2,3)\,}

is proportional to

x

i

f
(

|

x

|

)

{\displaystyle x_{i}f(|x|)\,}

where the adjoint indices are identified with the three-dimensional spatial indices. The gauge field at infinity is such that the Higgs field’s dependence on the angular directions is pure gauge. The precise configuration for the Higgs field and the gauge field near the origin is such that it satisfies the full Yang–Mills–Higgs equations of motion.
Mathematical details[edit]
Suppose the vacuum is the vacuum manifold Σ. Then, for finite energies, as we move along each direction towards spatial infinity, the state along the path approaches a point on the vacuum manifold Σ. Otherwise, we would not have a finite energy. In topologically trivial 3 + 1 dimensions, this means spatial infinity is homotopically equivalent to the topological sphere S2. So, the superselection sectors are classified by the second homotopy group of Σ, π2(Σ).
In the special case of a Yang–Mills–Higgs theory, the vacuum manifold is isomorphic to the quotient space G/H and the relevant homotopy group is π2(G/H). Note that this doesn’t actually require the existence of a scalar Higgs fie

Robert Lee Henry

For other people named Robert Henry, see Robert Henry (disambiguation).

Robert Lee Henry in 1917

Robert Lee Henry (May 12, 1864 – July 9, 1931) was a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from Texas from 1897 to 1917 (7th district: 1897–1903; 11th district: 1903–1917).

Contents

1 Early life
2 Political career
3 References
4 External links

Early life[edit]
Robert Lee Henry was the great-great-great grandson of Patrick Henry and was born in Linden, Texas on May 12, 1864. While a child, he attended public schools and moved to Bowie County in 1878 and to McLennan County in 1895. He was graduated from Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas in 1885. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1886 and practiced for a short time in Texarkana, Texas. He was graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 1887.
Political career[edit]
Henry was elected mayor of Texarkana in 1890 but resigned in 1891. He was then appointed First Assistant to the Attorney General of Texas 1891-1893 and Assistant Attorney General (1893–1896). He settled in Waco, Texas in 1895 and practiced law. He was elected as a Democrat to Congress from 1897-1917. From 1905-1907, Rep. Henry was Chairman of the House Democratic Caucus. He was also Chairman of the House Committee on Rules (1912–1917). A strong supporter of Woodrow Wilson in 1912, Henry was considered a progressive Democrat. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1916, but was an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic nomination for United States Senator. He engaged in the practice of law in Waco, and again was an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic nomination for United States Senator in 1922 and 1928. He moved to Houston, Texas in 1923 and resumed the practice of his profession. Robert L. Henry died in Houston, on July 9, 1931, from a self-inflicted gunshot to his head in an apparent suicide.[1] He was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Texarkana, Texas.
References[edit]

^ “Suicide Ends Career of R.L. Henry in Texas. Ex-Member of Congress, Long a Political Figure, Was Ill and Had Met Reverses.”. New York Times. July 10, 1931. Retrieved 2008-12-07. Worried over recent financial reverses and suffering from ill health, Robert Lee Henry, 67 years old, a member of Congress from Texas for twenty years, ended his life with a pistol shot at his residence here early this morning. 

External links[edit]

United States Congress. “Robert Lee Henry (id: H000516)”. Biogr

Gryphaea dilatata

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Gryphaea dilatata
Temporal range: oxfordian–kimmeridgian

PreЄ
Є
O
S
D
C
P
T
J
K
Pg
N

Gryphaea dilatata, 5½cm long

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Mollusca

Class:
Bivalvia

Order:
Ostreoida

Family:
Gryphaeidae

Genus:
Gryphaea

Species:
G. dilatata

Binomial name

Gryphaea dilatata
J. Sowerby, 1818

Gryphea dilatata, common name “devil’s toenail”[1] is a species of Jurassic oyster, an extinct marine bivalve mollusc in the family Gryphaeidae.
This fossil oyster is frequently found in abundance in the localities where it occurs. It belongs to the Oxfordian and Kimmeridgian clays of the Jurassic and can grow to a diameter in excess of 15 centimetres (5.9 in).
It lived a sedentary life-style, settled on the sea bed and was a filter feeder. Its abundance at certain localities — such as Furzy Cliff, Weymouth, Dorset, (England) — suggests it often formed large beds of hundreds of individuals.
It is closely related to the similar species Gryphaea dilobotes.
See also[edit]

Gryphaea arcuata
Jurassic Coast

References[edit]

^ http://piclib.nhm.ac.uk/piclib/www/image.php?img=59494

lateral view

Paleontology portal

This article about a prehistoric bivalve is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Cassagnes, Pyrénées-Orientales

Cassagnes
Cassanhas

A general view of Cassagnes

Coat of arms

Cassagnes

Location within Occitanie region 

Cassagnes

Coordinates: 42°44′28″N 2°36′44″E / 42.7411°N 2.6122°E / 42.7411; 2.6122Coordinates: 42°44′28″N 2°36′44″E / 42.7411°N 2.6122°E / 42.7411; 2.6122

Country
France

Region
Occitanie

Department
Pyrénées-Orientales

Arrondissement
Perpignan

Canton
Latour-de-France

Intercommunality
Perpignan Méditerranée Métropole

Government

 • Mayor (2014–2020)
Francis Izart

Area1
15.16 km2 (5.85 sq mi)

Population (2013)2
257

 • Density
17/km2 (44/sq mi)

Time zone
CET (UTC+1)

 • Summer (DST)
CEST (UTC+2)

INSEE/Postal code
66042 / 66720

Elevation
120–540 m (390–1,770 ft)
(avg. 340 m or 1,120 ft)

1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.
2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Cassagnes is a commune in the Pyrénées-Orientales department in southern France.

Contents

1 Geography
2 Population
3 See also
4 References

Geography[edit]
Cassagnes is located in the canton of Latour-de-France and in the arrondissement of Perpignan.

Map of Cassagnes and its surrounding communes

Population[edit]

Population 1962-2008

See also[edit]

Communes of the Pyrénées-Orientales department

References[edit]

INSEE

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Cassagnes (Pyrénées-Orientales).

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Communes of the Pyrénées-Orientales department

L’Albère
Alénya
Amélie-les-Bains-Palalda
Les Angles
Angoustrine-Villeneuve-des-Escaldes
Ansignan
Arboussols
Argelès-sur-Mer
Arles-sur-Tech
Ayguatébia-Talau
Bages
Baho
Baillestavy
Baixas
Banyuls-dels-Aspres
Banyuls-sur-Mer
Le Barcarès
La Bastide
Bélesta
Bolquère
Bompas
Boule-d’Amont
Bouleternère
Le Boulou
Bourg-Madame
Brouilla
La Cabanasse
Cabestany
Caixas
Calce
Calmeilles
Camélas
Campôme
Campoussy
Canaveilles
Canet-en-Roussillon
Canohès
Caramany
Casefabre
Cases-de-Pène
Cassagnes
Casteil
Castelnou
Catllar
Caudiès-de-Conflent
Caudiès-de-Fenouillèdes
Cerbère
Céret
Claira
Clara
Les Cluses
Codalet
Collioure
Conat
Corbère
Corbère-les-Cabanes
Corneilla-de-Conflent
Corneilla-del-Vercol
Corneilla-

Jangal, Qasr-e Qand

Jangal
جنگل

village

Jangal

Coordinates: 26°17′37″N 60°43′56″E / 26.29361°N 60.73222°E / 26.29361; 60.73222Coordinates: 26°17′37″N 60°43′56″E / 26.29361°N 60.73222°E / 26.29361; 60.73222

Country
 Iran

Province
Sistan and Baluchestan

County
Qasr-e Qand

Bakhsh
Central

Rural District
Holunchekan

Population (2006)

 • Total
197

Time zone
IRST (UTC+3:30)

 • Summer (DST)
IRDT (UTC+4:30)

Jangal (Persian: جنگل‎‎; also known as Shāhābād)[1] is a village in Holunchekan Rural District in the Central District of Qasr-e Qand County, Sistan and Baluchestan Province, Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 197, in 32 families.[2]
References[edit]

^ Jangal can be found at GEOnet Names Server, at this link, by opening the Advanced Search box, entering “-3744450” in the “Unique Feature Id” form, and clicking on “Search Database”.
^ “Census of the Islamic Republic of Iran, 1385 (2006)”. Islamic Republic of Iran. Archived from the original (Excel) on 2011-11-11. 

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Qasr-e Qand County

Capital

Qasr-e Qand

Districts

Central

Cities

Qasr-e Qand

Rural Districts
and villages

Holunchekan

Aliabad
Allahiabad
Amirabad
Anjiraki
Azad Gaz
Bufkan
Charti
Chutabad
Dahirak
Darvasak
Dehdati
Divari
Fazel Allahi
Gardak
Gatti
Gorban
Hajji Sabzan
Havaran
Holunchekan
Jakandar
Jamuk
Jangal
Kahurani Gevash
Kalatin Dap
Karchan
Karimabad
Karkum
Kolluk
Kushat-e Avval
Kushat-e Dum
Kushat-e Sum
Mirch
Padkub
Pasak
Potahk
Rahmanabad
Sarkajeh
Shadi Gur
Shadkam Dap
Tutoran Dap

Sarbuk

Cities

none

Rural Districts
and villages

Sarbuk

Aband
Azizabad
Bag
Bani-ye Shib
Bistak
Bitab
Chandukan
Danukan
Dep
Dezbon
Gehjan
Hajjiabad
Hamiri
Hezari
Hit
Kalmat
Katbon
Luriyani
Machguash
Mirabad
Mowrti Hanez
Nabakhsh
Qamarzeh
Qand
Ragdaf
Ragsha
Sarbak
Sartap
Sarush
Satag
Shah Kafer
Si Tall
Tahati
Tavakkol
Ziarat-e Jangal

Talang

Cities

none

Rural Districts
and villages

Talang

Bal
Bal-e Bala
Bal-e Pain
Buchchi
Bundi
Burniduk
Cheb
Chil
Chorrak
Dak
Dansar Kaldan
Dansar
Dazvanik
Dengari
Dirman
Gativan
Gazger
Gazi Zehi
Gurchari
Hajji Bazar
Jamig
Jodegalabad
Joghranvaru
Kach
Kachal
Kadarm
Kahnanzeh
Kahn-e Bala
Kahn-e Pain
Kal Kut
Kaldan
Kankowr
Kollanzeh
Kuchu
Kutiru
Lalu Bazar
Machik
Madineh Beyt-e Bala
Mandirow
Marungaz
Minab
Nalvad
Nowhani Bazar
Sar Tap
Sattani
Shahak B

Budapest Declaration on Machine Readable Travel Documents

The Budapest Declaration on Machine Readable Travel Documents[1] is a declaration issued by the Future of Identity in the Information Society (FIDIS), a Network of Excellence, to raise the concern to the public to the risks associated by a security architecture related to the management of Machine Readable Travel Documents (MRTDs), and its current implementation in passports of the European Union that creates some threats related to identity theft, and privacy. The declaration was proclaimed in Budapest in September 2006.[2][3][4]
References[edit]

^ Budapest Declaration on Machine Readable Travel Documents (MRTDs)
^ Biometric ID cards an insecure menace, says EU ID outfit, The Register, 10 November 2006
^ Cracked it!, Steve Boggan The Guardian, 17 November 2006
^ ePassports ‘at risk’ from cloning, BBC News, 15 December 2006

Painless Love

Painless Love

Directed by
Charley Chase

Produced by
Abe Stern
Julius Stern

Starring
Oliver Hardy

Production
company

L-KO Kompany

Distributed by
Universal Film Manufacturing Company

Release date

October 23, 1918 (1918-10-23)

Running time

2 reels

Country
United States

Language
Silent (English intertitles)

Painless Love is a 1918 American silent comedy film featuring Oliver Hardy.

Contents

1 Cast
2 Reception
3 See also
4 References
5 External links

Cast[edit]

Oliver Hardy as Dr. Hurts (credited as Babe Hardy)
Billy Armstrong as His assistant
Charles Inslee as The building owner
Peggy Prevost as Swimming pool manager

Reception[edit]
Like many American films of the time, Painless Love was subject to restrictions and cuts by city and state film censorship boards. For example, the Chicago Board of Censors required a cut, in Reel 1, of two scenes of young woman in one piece bathing suit playing hide-and-seek with the man, near view of young women at pool, two near views of young woman in bathing suit with apron, Reel 2, first two and last two scenes of young women in one piece bathing suits, two closeups of young woman with low cut gown at table, scene of man throwing coin in trouser front and following vulgar actions, two near views of couple in suggestive dance, and three scenes of “Madam Bevo” in suggestive dance where he wriggles tail of hula costume.[1]
See also[edit]

List of American films of 1918
Oliver Hardy filmography

References[edit]

^ “Official Cut-Outs by the Chicago Board of Censors”. Exhibitors Herald. New York City: Exhibitors Herald Company. 7 (26): 42. December 21, 1918. 

External links[edit]

Painless Love at the Internet Movie Database

This 1910s short comedy film-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Brandon Broady

This biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (December 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Brandon A. Broady

Birth name
Brandon Broady

Medium
comedy, film, radio personality, television personality

Nationality
American

Years active
2010 —

Notable works and roles
BET’s the Xperiment

Brandon A. Broady is an American comedian, actor and television host best known for hosting BET’s The Xperiment.[1]
Early life[edit]
Broady grew up in Silver Spring, Maryland and attended Springbrook High School and Towson University.
References[edit]

^ Bartel (February 25, 2015). “Towson University grad Brandon Broady hosting new BET series”. The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 

This article about an American actor or actress is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Klasztorne, Gryfino County

For other places with the same name, see Klasztorne.

Klasztorne

Village

Klasztorne

Coordinates: 52°56′37″N 14°37′39″E / 52.94361°N 14.62750°E / 52.94361; 14.62750

Country
Poland

Voivodeship
West Pomeranian

County
Gryfino

Gmina
Trzcińsko-Zdrój

Klasztorne [klaʂˈtɔrnɛ] (German Steineck) is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Trzcińsko-Zdrój, within Gryfino County, West Pomeranian Voivodeship, in north-western Poland.[1] It lies approximately 3 kilometres (2 mi) south of Trzcińsko-Zdrój, 36 km (22 mi) south of Gryfino, and 53 km (33 mi) south of the regional capital Szczecin.
Before 1945 the area was part of Germany. For the history of the region, see History of Pomerania.
References[edit]

^ “Central Statistical Office (GUS) – TERYT (National Register of Territorial Land Apportionment Journal)” (in Polish). 2008-06-01. 

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Gmina Trzcińsko-Zdrój

Town and seat

Trzcińsko-Zdrój

Villages

Antoniewice
Babin
Chełm Dolny
Chełm Górny
Cieplikowo
Czyste
Dobropole
Drzesz
Gogolice
Góralice
Górczyn
Klasztorne
Ostrzewka
Piaseczno
Rosnówko
Rosnowo
Smuga
Stołeczna
Strzeszów
Tchórzno
Wesoła

Coordinates: 52°56′37″N 14°37′39″E / 52.94361°N 14.62750°E / 52.94361; 14.62750

This Gryfino County location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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